What to do when your new puppy or kitten arrives

When you get your puppy or kitten, there are a few important things you need to do to make sure they stay happy and healthy:

  • Take them to The Pet Vet for a check-up and to book any remaining vaccinations and other treatments they are due. Remember to pop a reminder in your diary for any future vaccinations and worming/flea treatments and keep their microchip details up to date.
  • Sign up to our Pet Health Plan.
  • Get your new addition insured as soon as possible. This will be a significant help in the future if they fall ill or become injured.
  • Start to toilet train straight away.
  • When your puppy or kitten reaches 4-6 months old, you can get them neutered. This is a simple procedure to ensure that there are no unwanted pregnancies. In most cases, your puppy or kitten can be dropped off and picked up the same day and, after a very short confinement, they will be able to return to their normal routine.

Extra advice for new puppy owners:

  • Go along to training classes and start to socialise your puppy with vaccinated dogs and people in a safe, positive environment. You can do this as soon as your puppy has had their vaccination course and had a check up with a vet. While you shouldn’t let them walk on the ground or socialise with other dogs until they’ve been fully vaccinated, it’s usually safe to carry them around and start introducing them to the sights, sounds and smells of the outdoors – check with your vet to find out what’s best for your puppy.
  • Make sure all training is consistent and that your family all stick to the same rules. If you don’t, your puppy might get confused and frustrated as well as finding it more difficult to learn. Read our advice on positive, reward-based training.
  • Make boundaries clear from the beginning and stick to them. For example, if you don’t want your dog to go on the sofa, you need to make sure you and your family keep to this from day one.
  • Always make sure your puppy has space when they need it and aren’t overwhelmed. If they need to sleep and rest, let them.

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